Paul Clarke has a 4-Point Plan to Promote Animal Welfare in Ireland

  1. Recognize the Connection between Animal Welfare and Animal Health. Paul supports promoting the understanding among Ireland’s citizens that a healthy animal population—including a significant portion of Ireland’s food supply—is closely related to appropriate animal welfare practices. Animals are not healthy when they are mistreated or abused, and an unhealthy animal population will equate to more disease and illness borne by the Irish people.
  2. Improve Farm Yields and Quality by Promoting Animal Welfare. Paul supports implementing Animal Welfare best practices at Ireland’s farms in order to increase farm output and food quality. Irish farmers and Irish consumers benefit from greater availability of healthy, nutritious agricultural products. Promoting animal welfare is a boon to the local economy.
  3. Take Proactive Measures to Reduce Disease Proliferation. Paul supports enacting appropriate regulations to prevent the spread of disease throughout agricultural and domestic animal populations. While small and family businesses should be relatively free from government intrusion, the prevention of disease is a high priority for all Irish people. As such, the government should be willing to work with farmers and other animal-related interest groups to craft intelligent rules that will balance the rights of animal owners and the expectation we all hold for a disease-free environment.
  4. End Fox hunting, cub-hunting and Animal Fighting practices. Paul supports government action that ends the practice of fox hunting, cub-hunting, coursing, “Digging Out,” and other animal fighting that unnecessarily causes pain, suffering and harm to wild and domesticated animal. As the World Organization for Animal Health has recognized, the use of animals in recreation should be reserved for instances that make a major contribution to the wellbeing of people. It is difficult to argue that these practices meet that standard.


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Paul Clarke, Independent